REVIEW - Open sources - voices from the open source revolution

Title:

Open sources - voices from the open source revolution

Author:

Chris DiBona, Sam Ockman

ISBN:

1565925823

Publisher:

O'Reilly (1999)

Pages:

272pp

Reviewer:

Francis Glassborow

Reviewed:

August 1999

Rating:

★★★★★

Obviously I like this book and enjoyed reading it. I think you will too.

When someone talks about the 'Open Source' movement how clear an understanding do you have about what they are referring to? I had seen this term used with increasing frequency over the last couple of years. As the term is more (accurately) descriptive than most I had not realised that it referred to a very specific set of developments. This book set me straight.

It is a collection of very readable (well mostly) essays written by the leading lights in the movement. The writings of people like Eric Raymond (of "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" fame - see:

http://www.tuxedo.org/~esr/writings/cathedral-bazaar/) are always thought provoking as well as being readable and well-informed.

If you want to understand what is happening in the software development community then you need to read books like this one. The principles of Open Source software may seem radically different from what you are used to, but at least find out what they are before you decide.

Obviously I like this book and enjoyed reading it. I think you will too. If you cannot afford to buy it, borrow a copy, but also buy your own when you can afford it. Good books deserve to be bought and the only way you can vote for the good is by spending some money. (Would Linux be half so successful if it were always given away?).


Book cover image courtesy of Open Library.