REVIEW - Programming Microsoft Visual C++

Title:

Programming Microsoft Visual C++

Author:

David K. Kruglinski, Scot Wingo, George Shepherd

ISBN:

9781572318571

Publisher:

Microsoft Press (1998)

Pages:

1150pp

Reviewer:

Francis Glassborow

Reviewed:

March 1999

Rating:

3 out of 5

I think that if you intend to do much programming for MSWindows you might find Programming Microsoft Visual C++ worth the considerable cost.

Microsoft Press has always (to my mind) been one of the better parts of Microsoft. Unfortunately some of its more expensive texts have relatively short shelf lives. The predecessors of these books are cases in point.

The programmer's guides are specific to major releases of Microsoft Visual C++. They have absolutely nothing to do with C++, they are manuals on the use of the product. Indeed, once upon a time they would have been shipped in the box with the software. If you are new to VC++ or if you are struggling with the features of the latest release you might have to dig into your financial reserves to buy a copy. If your employers expect you to use VC++ 6.0 then they should have purchased copies for reference by their programmers. The time saved and therefore increased productivity would rapidly repay the investment.

Kruglinski's book is a bit different. If you are already familiar with the previous edition you will be spending a lot of money for the update (I wish the book trade would consider the concept of upgrading at reduced cost, say exchange an earlier edition for this one at half price).

Again this is not a book about C++. However this time the book is about programming. If you want to learn to use MFC 6.0 and various other component resources this is the book for you. For example suppose you want to know how to use (not write your own) an ActiveX control in your program, chapter 8 will help you out. Having learnt to use these you probably want to learn how to write your own. Part IV (300+ pages) will help you here.

While using Microsoft's wizards is product specific much of the rest of this book would prove useful to those using other development tools such as CodeWarrior or even C++ Builder.

I think that if you intend to do much programming for MSWindows you might find Programming Microsoft Visual C++ worth the considerable cost however Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 Programmer's Guide has a much more limited appeal. In both cases the books are well written and useful to the target reader but make sure you are one of these before spending your money.


Book cover image courtesy of Open Library.