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The ACCU passes on review copies of computer books to its members for them to review. The result is a large, high quality collection of book reviews by programmers, for programmers. Currently there are 1918 reviews in the database and more every month.
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Title:
Windows NT in a Nutshell
Author:
E Pearce
ISBN:
1-56592-251- 4
Publisher:
O'Reilly
Pages:
348pp
Price:
£14.95
Reviewer:
Brian Bramer
Subject:
MS Windows; reference
Appeared in:
10-2
Using and managing Windows NT is a non-trivial task despite its extensive on-line help system. This text is intended as a desktop reference for NT workstation and NT server suitable for readers ranging from the home PC user to an administrator of a complex NT based network.

After an introduction to the features of NT in chapter 1, chapter 2 considers setting up and tuning your local computer with a detailed description of the control panel and how to add/remove software and hardware, set up system parameters, etc. (useful to both end-users and network administrators). Chapter 3 looks at the tasks of the network administrator and how to manage multiple computers, i.e. the tools grouped under the Administration tools menu such as backup, DHCP manager, disk administrator, etc. Chapter 4 looks at accessories such as dial- up networking and telnet and chapter 5 RAS (Remote Access Service) protocols. Chapter 6 takes one back to the command line (DOS like but much more powerful) and chapter 7 discusses management techniques. Appendices describe NetBIOS, TCP/IP, compare NT server and NT workstation and look at where to find further information. The administration of networks incorporating NT, UNIX, Novel Netware and Apple Macs is considered and examples presented.

The material is well organised and the index is excellent. In particular the chapters on the NT GUI use graphical maps to show menu options as an aid in finding ones way around this very complex system. Clearly this book does not give the level of detail in the massive 1000 page volumes one sees on NT. Recommended as very useful tutorial and reference on NT for both users and professional network administrators.