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The ACCU passes on review copies of computer books to its members for them to review. The result is a large, high quality collection of book reviews by programmers, for programmers. Currently there are 1918 reviews in the database and more every month.
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Title:
The Road to the Unified Software Development Process
Author:
Ivar Jaconson
ISBN:
0 521 78774 2
Publisher:
SIGS books
Pages:
358pp
Price:
£24-95
Reviewer:
Silvia de Beer
Subject:
object oriented
Appeared in:
13-2
I am wondering what the target audience is of this book. The book contains 31 revised articles, the majority written in 1995. The book would be good marketing material on Rational Software Corporation's sales talks and demonstrations. The book is divided into seven parts, each focusing on another topic. After each part there are a few pages of interview with Jacobson, which add little to what has already been said.

The book gives a background view on the history of UML and the coming of the Unified Process. Jacobson describes his years at Ericsson and how he successfully developed components and gained experience with the software engineering process. Jacobson explains that the creation of the Rational Software Corporation did put together the ideas of three main methodologists, which each had their own focus points. The importance of use cases is described, how to do object modelling and where reuse and Component Based Development comes in. Jacobson stresses the importance of defining interfaces. He explains the software engineering process and the need of tools to support the process. The final part covers how architecture fits into software development.

The book is not uninteresting to read but by not being able to classify its target audience, I cannot call it more than some background reading to other published articles and books by Jacobson.