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The ACCU passes on review copies of computer books to its members for them to review. The result is a large, high quality collection of book reviews by programmers, for programmers. Currently there are 1918 reviews in the database and more every month.
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Title:
OpenSources
Author:
Chris DiBona, Sam Ockman&Mark Stone
ISBN:
1 56592 582 3
Publisher:
O'Reilly
Pages:
270pp
Price:
£16-50
Reviewer:
Francis Glassborow
Subject:
technology
Appeared in:
11-4
When someone talks about the 'Open Source' movement how clear an understanding do you have about what they are referring to? I had seen this term used with increasing frequency over the last couple of years. As the term is more (accurately) descriptive than most I had not realised that it referred to a very specific set of developments. This book set me straight.

It is a collection of very readable (well mostly) essays written by the leading lights in the movement. The writings of people like Eric Raymond (of "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" fame - see:

http://www.tuxedo.org/~esr/writings/cathedral-bazaar/) are always thought provoking as well as being readable and well-informed.

If you want to understand what is happening in the software development community then you need to read books like this one. The principles of Open Source software may seem radically different from what you are used to, but at least find out what they are before you decide.

Obviously I like this book and enjoyed reading it. I think you will too. If you cannot afford to buy it, borrow a copy, but also buy your own when you can afford it. Good books deserve to be bought and the only way you can vote for the good is by spending some money. (Would Linux be half so successful if it were always given away?).