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Search in Book Reviews

The ACCU passes on review copies of computer books to its members for them to review. The result is a large, high quality collection of book reviews by programmers, for programmers. Currently there are 1918 reviews in the database and more every month.
Search is a simple string search in either book title or book author. The full text search is a search of the text of the review.
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Title:
Maximum Security
Author:
Anonymous
ISBN:
1 57521 268 4
Publisher:
Sams
Pages:
885pp+CD
Price:
£46-95 *
Reviewer:
Francis Glassborow
Subject:
internet; security
Appeared in:
10-1
Like the previous book this is about Internet security. The author has elected to remain anonymous on the grounds that he is an experienced hacker (to be relevant that should be cracker, and internal evidence suggests that is his qualification). Like the previous book this is a combination of printed text and CD.

The book covers Windows (all versions), Unix (all main flavours) and Macintosh with separate collections of relevant programs for each on the CD. The CD is set up as a WWW site and can easily be navigated with your browser. There are links to the sites of the providers of the software so that you can easily update it, register shareware etc.

This book is aimed more at the manager of a small intranet or small commercial Web site rather than the private user who just wants to surf the web. This means that much of the software is aimed at your need for supervising other users. Therefore you will find utilities for things such as validating the security of your users' passwords.

The focus of this book is less about awareness of dangers (leading to better user habits) and more about how to protect those in your care. While still not at the level of the genuine network expert it expects a degree of computer literacy coupled with a greater level of need than would be common among computer hobbyists. If you are going to give advice (even informally) to others about security issues you would be well advised to have read and understood this book or one like it.

One reason that I have reviewed this book is that I am becoming increasingly concerned that someone is going to get their fingers legally burned. You may know that your expertise is limited to programming but are you sure that those that talk to you understand this? Are you sure that the law courts will accept that your liability to your client was strictly limited to programming issues? It is worth thinking about this and if you are the kind of person who is free with their advice make sure that you are well informed.