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The ACCU passes on review copies of computer books to its members for them to review. The result is a large, high quality collection of book reviews by programmers, for programmers. Currently there are 1918 reviews in the database and more every month.
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Title:
Appled Software Architecture
Author:
Christine Hofmeister et al.
ISBN:
0 201 32571 3
Publisher:
Addison-Wesley
Pages:
395pp
Price:
£30.99
Reviewer:
Roger N Lever
Subject:
engineering
Appeared in:
13-3
Software Architecture is a key element in any program, whether it is designed into the developed product or is simply a by-product of the development process used. This book is aimed at being a practical guide to designing, describing and applying software architecture.

The approach used is to breakdown the software architecture into four complementary and overlapping views conceptual, module, execution and code. A chapter is also devoted to something the authors describe as global analysis - identifying factors that affect the architecture design (organisational, technological and product). Finally, four case studies are retrospectively described using the four-view model, although they were not developed using it.

There are some useful ideas within the clearly written text for example the organised approach, the strategies (separate and encapsulate code dependent on the target platform...) and the summary case study learnings. However, I found it rather disingenuous in the case studies to apply the approach retrospectively. The utility of an approach is found in its application and the results.

For developers who have an interest in understanding more about software architecture then this book does offer some useful insights. The criticism regarding the case studies should not detract too heavily from the book since it is very common that case studies are not worked examples, with all their trials and tribulations, but finished ones. It would be good if some publishers were to note this and encourage some books with an in-the-trenches feel to the subject. In short for those with an interest in Software Architecture this book has some value.