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Overload Journal #106 - December 2011

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Editorial: Patently Ridiculous!
Description : Software patents have a chequered history. Ric Parkin looks at some of the problems.
Category: [ Journal Editorial ]

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Overload 106 PDF

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07 December 2011 13:50:01 +00:00

Moving with the Times
Description : The ACCU is primarily a way for programmers to communicate. Alan Griffiths looks at its past, and speculates on its future.
Category: [ Project Management | Process Topics ]
The Eternal Battle Against Redundancies, Part I
Description : The drive to remove redundancies is widely seen as a good thing. Christoph Knabe sees how it has influenced programming languages.
Category: [ Programming Topics ]
From the Age of Power to the Age of Magic and beyond...
Description : Certain abilities allowed some societies to dominate their peers. Sergey Ignatchenko takes a historical perspective on dominant societies.
Category: [ Process Topics ]
RAII is not Garbage
Description : Many think that Garbage Collection frees the programmer from cleanup tasks. Paul Grenyer compares and contrasts it with a classic C++ idiom.
Category: [ Programming Topics ]
Why Polynomial Approximation Won't Cure Your Calculus Blues
Description : We’re still trying to find a good way to approach numerical computing. Richard Harris tries to get as close as possible.
Category: [ Programming Topics ]
Concurrent Programming with Go
Description : Concurrency is becoming ever more important. Mark Summerfield looks at the approach of the new language Go.
Category: [ Programming Topics ]